Carla Lipsig-Mummé Named 2018 Winner of SSHRC Impact Partnership Award

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The Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC) announced today that Professor Carla Lipsig-Mummé is the winner of the 2018 Impact Partnership Award for her pioneering work in the area of labour, workplaces and mitigating the impacts of climate change.

Carla Lipsig-Mummé is a Professor of Work and Labour Studies at York University, and the Principal Investigator of the seven-year SSHRC grant titled “Adapting Canadian Work and Workplaces to Respond to Climate Change: Canada in International Perspective.”

Her Excellency the Right Honourable Julie Payette, Governor General, will present Professor Lipsig-Mummé and recipients of the 2018 SSHRC Impact Awards with their prizes at a ceremony at Rideau Hall this evening. The Honourable Kirsty Duncan, minister of Science and Sport, will join the Governor General for the event.

Professor Lipsig-Mummé said, “The SSHRC Impact Award that I’ve won today encapsulates the ways in which SSHRC opens doors for research and makes it possible for young researchers to broaden and deepen their work and their goals. This way of working—use the unsolved questions arising in a finishing project to define and shape the next project—was made possible by SSHRC and has shaped my work through my long career.”

In a statement, Ted Hewitt, President of SSHRC, said, “The five Impact Award recipients are innovators who have demonstrated a strong commitment to making their research known and accessible by embracing multisector, multidisciplinary, and multi-institutional collaboration. Their work contributes to making Canada a leader in social sciences and humanities research and research training.”

Professor Lipsig-Mummé is an expert in work and labour studies and leads the Work and Climate Change (WCC) international, community-university network partnership, which has grown from five partners and eight researchers to 52 partners over the past two decades. The WCC addresses the intersection of climate change and the working world. The WCC plans on promoting “just transition,” a term that refers to the global goal of balancing the transition to low-carbon economies while protecting and bettering jobs and work for all workers, as well as providing for those workers who lose their jobs in the process.

See also:

 

Learn more at www.sshrc-crsh.gc.ca

 

 

Carla Lipsig-Mummé named finalist for prestigious Impact Award by SSHRC

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The Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC) has named York University’s Professor Carla Lipsig-Mummé as a finalist for its prestigious 2018 Impact Award in the Partnership Category. Carla Lipsig-Mummé is a Professor of Work and Labour Studies at York University, and the Principal Investigator of the seven-year SSHRC grant titled “Adapting Canadian Work and Workplaces to Respond to Climate Change: Canada in International Perspective.”

Announcing the finalists, SSHRC said the annual Impact Awards recognize the highest achievements from outstanding researchers and students in social sciences and humanities research, research training, knowledge mobilization and scholarship funded partially or completely by SSHRC.

Selected by a jury composed of renowned experts from academia and the private, public and not-for-profit sectors, the Impact Awards finalists embody the very best ideas and research about people, human thought and behaviour, and culture—helping us understand and improve the world around us, today and into the future, according to SSHRC.

The Partnership Award recognizes a SSHRC-funded formal partnership for its outstanding achievement in advancing research, research training or knowledge mobilization, or developing a new partnership approach to research and/or related activities. It is awarded to a partnership that, through mutual co-operation and shared intellectual leadership and resources, has demonstrated impact and influence within and/or beyond the social sciences and humanities research community.

In addition to Carla Lipsig-Mummé of York University, the other nominees are Jonathan Crush of Wilfrid Laurier University, and Jack Quarter of the University of Toronto. The winners in each category—Talent, Insight, Connection and Partnership, as well as the Gold Medal recipient, will receive their awards at Rideau Hall in Ottawa on Wednesday, October 3, 2018.

 

 

Carla Lipsig-Mummé to discuss “Work in a Warming World” at Ottawa event

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Work in a Warming World

Carla Lipsig-Mummé, Professor, Work and Labour Studies, York University
October 3, 2018

The Federation for the Humanities and Social Sciences has partnered with the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) to offer you this special Big Thinking event in celebration of their 40th anniversary.

With Centre Block undergoing renovations, this event will take place at the John A. Macdonald Building on Wellington Street, Room 200, right across from Parliament Hill. Registration coming soon.

 

Learn more at www.ideas-idees.ca

 

Workshop asks “What kind of Green and Just Transition?”

ProBE CENTRE FOR THE STUDY OF THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT, WBS – WESTMINSTER BUSINESS SCHOOL, UNIVERSITY OF WESTMINSTER, in collaboration with fABE – FACULTY OF ARCHITECTURE AND THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT, proudly announce this timely workshop:

WHAT KIND OF GREEN AND JUST TRANSITION?

WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT

DATE: Thursday 12 July 2018, 12 noon-18.00pm

VENUE: Room CG28, University of Westminster Marylebone Campus, 35 Marylebone Road, London NW1 5LS (opposite Madame Tussaud and diagonal from Baker Street tube station)

There is much discussion as well as divergent approaches to the question of a just transition to a low carbon economy, revolving around what is achievable by the market or by ecological modernisation and whether instead a much more radical transformation is necessary. This workshop addresses this debate and is concerned in particular with the active role of workers and the trade unions in this transition, including examples from the built environment of successful intervention.

Many researchers who are part of the Adapting Canadian Work and Workplaces to Respond to Climate Change: Canada in International Perspective (ACW) research project will be participating in the workshop.

Speakers include:

  • Dr Peter Bonfield (tbc), Vice-Chancellor University of Westminster
  • Linda Clarke, ProBE/University of Westminster, ACW Associate Director
  • Béla Galgóczi, European Trade Union Institute, ACW Co-Investigator
  • Colin Gleeson, ProBE/University of Westminster, ACW Co-Investigator
  • Professor Malcolm Kirkup (tbc), Dean, Westminster Business School
  • Mercedes Landolfi (Fillea CGIL, Italy)
  • Carla Lipsig-Mummé, York University, ACW Principal Investigator
  • Sam Mason, Public and Commercial Services (PCS) Union
  • Philip Pearson (GJA)
  • Vivian Price (US)
  • Melahat Sahin-Dikmen, ProBE/University of Westminster
  • Lisa Schulte, Middlesex University
  • Dimitris Stevis, Colorado State University, ACW Co-Investigator
  • Fred Steward, University of Westminster, ACW Co-Investigator

and others.

A complete agenda, speakers, and biographies are available here.

To reserve a place and for further information, contact, Melahat Sahin-Dikmen at M.Sahindikmen@westminster.ac.uk or Linda Clarke at clarkel@westminster.ac.uk

ILO Draws on ACW Research to Promote Worker Engagement in Addressing Climate Change

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International Labour Organization’s World Employment and Social Outlook Report 2018 draws on York Partnership Programme ACW to promote worker engagement in addressing climate change

 

World Employment and Social Outlook 2018: Greening with jobs
World Employment and Social Outlook 2018: Greening with jobs

In its flagship report, World Employment and Social Outlook 2018: Greening with Jobs, released in Geneva this month, the United Nations International Labour Organization (ILO) says that action to limit global warming to 2 degrees Celsius will result in sufficient job creation to more than offset job losses of 6 million elsewhere. In fact, twenty-four million new jobs will be created globally by 2030 if the right policies to promote a greener economy are put in place.

The ILO’s report devotes a key section to the importance of workers organizations, such as unions, in reducing the harmful impact of climate change, stating that “… the participation of workers’ and employers’ organizations must be integrated in mitigation and adaptation policies.”

The UN agency notes that environmental clauses negotiated into collective agreements can have a positive impact, and draws upon data contained in the unique Green Collective Agreements Database compiled by York University’s Adapting Canadian Work and Workplaces to Respond to Climate Change: Canada in International Perspective (ACW) research project.

“Through collective agreements, employers and trade unions have worked together to identify areas, including GHG emissions, where a reduction in environmental impact could be achieved without losses in jobs, pay and working conditions,” it states. The ILO report includes a detailed table of 19 green clauses from collective agreements, grouped into five categories including green procurement, green travel, cutting waste and saving resources, the right to refuse work, and whistle-blower protection.

“I am delighted that our research on worker agency in reducing climate change is being taken up by such a prestigious and influential body as the United Nations International Labour Organization,” said Principal Investigator Dr. Carla Lipsig-Mummé of York University’s Department of Social Science, Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies.

York University’s ACW research project is winning increased recognition by international and Canadian institutions. The ILO report is the second time a UN agency has used research produced by the ACW, following the citation of ACW’s work by the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCC) secretariat in 2016.

As well, Dr. Lipsig-Mummé was named finalist for prestigious Impact Award by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC) in 2017, and she was the 2018 winner of the Sefton-Williams Award for Contributions to Labour Relations by the University of Toronto’s Woodsworth College and the Centre for Industrial Relations and Human Resources.

The only tripartite U.N. agency, since 1919 the International Labour Organization (ILO) brings together governments, employers and workers of 187 member States, to set labour standards, develop policies and devise programmes promoting decent work for all women and men.

The Adapting Canadian Work and Workplaces to Respond to Climate Change: Canada in International Perspective (ACW) research project is a SSHRC-funded partnership grant which brings together 56 individual researchers and 25 partner organizations from seven countries, and is based at York University.

World Employment and Social Outlook 2018: Greening with Jobs, published by the ILO, is available from the ILO website at: http://www.ilo.org/global/about-the-ilo/newsroom/news/WCMS_628644/lang–en/index.htm

 

Download the full report (PDF)

 

Dr. Carla Lipsig-Mummé wins 2018 Sefton-Williams Award for Contributions to Labour Relations

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York University Professor Carla Lipsig-Mummé has been named the 2018 winner of the Sefton-Williams Award for Contributions to Labour Relations. It honours those who have made a significant contribution to the field of labour relations and human rights.

The Sefton-Williams award is presented by the University of Toronto’s Woodsworth College and the Centre for Industrial Relations and Human Resources. Both practitioners in labour relations as well as academics have received this award.

“Professor Lipsig-Mummé’s research and activism in the labour relations field, most recently and innovatively exploring the link between climate change and the world of work, has bridged the gap between practitioner and scholar,” said Professor Rafael Gomez, Director of the Centre for Industrial Relations and Human Resources. “The Sefton-Williams committee chose to honour these achievements.”

Award announcement

Dr. Lipsig-Mummé joins the ranks of eminent Canadians who have been honoured with the Sefton-Williams award, including former President of the Canadian Auto Workers and the Canadian Labour Congress Bob White, feminist labour activist and Professor Emeritus of Women’s Studies at York University Linda Briskin, and former Leader of the New Democratic Party of Canada Ed Broadbent.

Carla Lipsig-Mummé is Professor of Work and Labour Studies at York University, and is currently Principal Investigator of the Adapting Canadian Work and Workplaces to Respond to Climate Change (ACW) research project, which brings together 56 individual researchers and 25 partner organizations in seven countries. Its ground-breaking work has been recognized by the Secretariat of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC).

The Sefton-Williams Award for Contributions to Labour Relations is named in honour of Mr. Larry Sefton and Mr. Lynn Williams, two accomplished leaders of the United Steelworkers of America. The award ceremony and memorial lecture will be held on Thursday, March 29, 2018 from 4:00 PM until 6:00 PM in the Kruger Hall Commons, Woodsworth College, 119 St. George St., Toronto. Juliet Schor, Professor of Sociology at Boston College, will deliver the memorial lecture entitled, “Dependence and Precarity in the ‘Sharing’ Economy.”

For more information or to register to attend the ceremony, visit the Centre for Industrial Relations and Human Resources’ website at http://www.cirhr.utoronto.ca/about-cirhr/sefton-memorial-lecture/

Book Launch: Climate Change and Gender in Rich Countries

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Friday, November 10th 2017
5:00 P.M. – 7:00 P.M.

Noah Meltz Reading Room
CIRHR Library
University of Toronto
121 St. George St., Toronto, ON M5S 2E8

ATTENDANCE IS FREE

RSVP to acwinfo@yorku.ca

 

Climate change is at the forefront of ideas about public policy, the economy and labour issues. However, the gendered dimensions of climate change and the public policy issues associated with it in wealthy nations
are much less understood.

Climate Change and Gender in Rich Countries covers a wide range of issues dealing with work and working life. The book demonstrates the gendered distinctions in both experiences of climate change and the ways that public policy deals with it. The book draws on case studies from the UK, Sweden, Australia, Canada, Spain and the US to address key issues such as: how gendered distinctions affect the most vulnerable; paid and unpaid work; and activism on climate change. It is argued that including gender as part of the analysis will lead to more equitable and stronger societies as solutions to climate change advance.

This volume will be of great relevance to students, scholars, trade unionists and international organisations with an interest in climate change, gender, public policy and environmental studies.

Introduction
CARLA LIPSIG-MUMMÉ, Project Lead, Work in a Warming World (W3) and Adapting Canadian Work and Workplaces (ACW) research programmes.

Speakers
MARJORIE GRIFFIN COHEN, Simon Fraser University
Editor

ELLIE PERKINS, York University
Canadian Indigenous Female Leadership and Political Agency on Climate Change

KENDRA COULTER, Brock University
Towards Humane Jobs: Recognizing Gendered, Multispecies Intersections and Possibilities

LINDA CLARKE, University of Westminster
Women and Low Energy Construction in Europe: A New Opportunity?

BIPASHA BARUAH, Western University
Renewable Inequity? Women’s Employment in Clean Energy in Industrialized, Emerging and Developing Economies

Environmental Racism: Adding African Canadians’ Voices to the Climate Change Debate

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By Mark Brown

A ground-breaking undertaking between The Coalition of Black Trade Unionists, Canadian Chapter (CBTU) and an organization known as Adapting Canadian Work and Workplaces (ACW) threatens to blow a hole through the climate change debate that rivals the current hole in the ozone layer.

With the inception of a ground breaking research initiative called “The Impact of Climate Change on Racialized Canadian Communities: An Environmental Justice Perspective” the two organizations have lunched a research initiative on Environmental Racism. The goal of the research project is to assess the effect of climate change on racialized communities within Canada. The Adapting Canadian Work and Workplaces (ACW) is a partnership grant of the Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC).

Photo of Carla Lipsig Mumme
Dr. Carla Lipsig-Mummé
Adapting Canadian Work and Workplaces (ACW)

Dr. Carla Lipsig-Mummé is the Principal Researcher for Adapting Canadian Work and Workplaces (ACW). When asked how did the CBTU/ACW partnership came about Dr. Mummé stated that the ACW is a 7-year grant funded by the Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC). With 47 individual researchers and 24 partner organizations the ACW spans 4 countries. Included among the list of organizations were York University, (Lead Organization), the Canadian Labour Congress, the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives, the Ontario Federation of Labour and more. Dr. Mummé went on to say that “CBTU was invited to become a partner organization given the organizations unique mandate to provide a voice for workers of African-descent along with CBTU’s engagement within the environmental justice movement.”

Dr. Mummé was then asked what the ACW expects to achieve by this project? “Climate literacy for every stage and age in the Canadian workforce,” she stated. “Community involvement and mobilization in the struggle to slow climate change; making resources and curriculum available for green training and education by unions for labour environmentalists and students; Youth—young workers and young students—taking leadership to reduce greenhouse gases in their schools and their workplaces; a larger role for young people who are passionate about the environment, in shaping union renewal. Linking greening work and youth union activism in union renewal. ACW hopes that Black Trade Unionists, and other racialized communities’ engagement in the fight to slow global warming will point the way to new pathways to green jobs. CBTU is very well placed to recognize pathways to new green jobs that are developing from responding to the threat of climate change, and to take steps so that this and the next generations of Black Trade Unionists are leaders in the shift to a green world of work. CBTU is very well placed to be a model for other communities as well.”

Photo of Chris Wilson
Chris Wilson, 1st Vice President and International Board Member of CBTU Canada

Chris Wilson is the Project Lead, 1st Vice President of the Coalition of Black Trade Unionists (CBTU) in Canada and an International Board Member. When asked why African-Canadian workers should be concerned about climate change? He responded by stating that, “The destructiveness and speed of climate change is a call to action. This project is designed to explore the impact of climate change upon racialized communities within Canada.”

Wilson went on to say that, “A significant amount of research has gone into exploring the impact of Climate change upon indigenous peoples with the Idle No More movement. This project intends to bring this vision of community mobilization around climate change to other racialized communities by drawing Black Trade Unionists and other racialized communities into the fight to slow climate change while linking this fight with the development of pathways to good green jobs for the aforementioned communities.”

Wilson further stated that, “The debate over climate change is already here and the consequences are real; CBTU and ACW want to ensure that the voices of Black Trade Unionists are included in this debate to ensure that as our economy evolves and adapts to climate change and the voices of racialized workers are heard.”

According to the ACW’s website the research project is expected to encompass multiple stages with a focus upon research and mobilization.

The first stage is described as a participatory research model which evolves the use of social media to engage anti-racist activists in the process of collecting written materials that have been composed about environmental racism.

The second stage of the project is comprised of a workshop/focus-group of Black Trade Unionists. The purpose of this stage is to accumulate research data on the participants’ experience surrounding climate change and environmental racism.

The third stage is expected to provide a workshop/community forum for community engagement. The themes of the workshops include:

  • What is to be understood by the words “environmental racism?”
  • How it is affecting communities and their environment?
  • Exploring case studies in Canada.
  • The present and future role of racialized communities in the “Green Economy” and Developing an Environmental Racism Charter

The fourth and final stage of the project will be a joint report and video. Both the video and report are expected to be housed on the ACW and CBTU Canada websites.

Whether one believes in the existence of climate change or believes that climate change is fiction what is evident is that the debate on climate change has been ongoing for some time. What is also apparent is that if the African Canadian voicesof this generation continue to be omitted from the debate the African Canadians faces of the next generation risk being omitted from the solution.

Picture of Mark Brown

 

Mark Brown is the Chair of the Toronto and York Region Labour Council’s Equity Committee, an Executive Board Member of the Coalition of Black Trade Unionist (CBTU), An Executive Board Member of the Labour Education Center and a member of the Toronto Local of the Canadian Union of Postal Workers.

Contact him on Facebook and Twitter @MarkAAABrown

Carla Lipsig-Mummé named finalist for prestigious Impact Award by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC)

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The Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC) has named York University’s Professor Carla Lipsig-Mumme as a finalist for its prestigious 2017 Impact Award in the Partnership Category.

Carla Lipsig-Mummé is a Professor of Work and Labour Studies at York University, and the Principal Investigator of the seven-year SSHRC grant titled “Adapting Canadian Work and Workplaces to Respond to Climate Change: Canada in International Perspective.”

The Impact Awards finalists embody the very best ideas and research about people, human thought and behaviour, and culture—helping people understand and improve the world around us, today and into the future, according to SSHRC.

Professor Lipsig-Mummé was selected by a jury composed of renowned experts from academia, as well as from the private, public and not-for-profit sectors.

The Partnership Award recognizes a SSHRC-funded formal partnership for its outstanding achievement in advancing research, research training or knowledge mobilization, or developing a new partnership approach to research and/or related activities. It is awarded to a partnership that, through mutual co-operation and shared intellectual leadership and resources, has demonstrated impact and influence within and/or beyond the social sciences and humanities research community.

The two other Partnership category finalists are Professor Carol Kauppi of Laurentian University, and Professor Jack Quarter of the University of Toronto. The winners in each of the 2017 Impact Award categories of Talent, Insight, Connection and Partnership—as well as the Gold Medal recipient—will receive their awards at Rideau Hall in Ottawa on Friday, September 15, 2017.

 

Learn more from www.sshrc-crsh.gc.ca

 

Video: Darker Politics: Democracies, Labour Rights and Climate Change

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Friday, May 26, 2017
Toronto, Ontario

An Adapting Canadian Work and Workplaces Outreach Event

 

Speakers:

Larry Brown, National Union of Public and General Employees, moderator | Starts 4:01

Tony Burman, Ryerson University and Toronto Star, “Democracy Under Threat” | Starts 14:34

Dr. Elaine Bernard, Harvard University, “Trump’s War on Workers and the Environment” | Starts 40:33

Jim Chorostecki, British Columbia Federation of Labour, “The Softwood Lumber Dispute is the Hatfields vs. McCoys Feud Without the Guns, So Far.” | Starts 1:12:30

 

Download the Pamphlet (PDF)

 

Larry Brown

Larry Brown, National Union of Public and General Employees, moderator | Starts 4:01

With degrees in political science and law, Larry, President of Canada’s second largest union, has a wide range of experience in government, pension fund management, public administration, labour relations, teaching and legal issues. He has written and spoken extensively about public finances, debt and deficit issues, the changes in federal provincial financing, public sector restructuring and the resulting changes in the economic and political structures of Canada that have occurred in the last decade. As an elected Officer of the National Union of Public and General Employees for over 25 years, Larry has extensive experience overseeing NUPGE’s policy on environmental issues. Larry is the Interim Leader of ACW’s Environmental Law and Labour Law research group.

 

Tony-Burman-June-8-2015-debate

Tony Burman, Ryerson University and Toronto Star, “Democracy Under Threat” | Starts 14:34

Tony is world affairs columnist with the Toronto Star. He is former head of CBC News in Canada and of Al Jazeera English in Qatar – responsible for their TV, radio and online journalism. For more than 30 years, he was an award-winning news and documentary producer at the CBC, including seven years as its Editor-in-Chief. He was Distinguished Visiting Professor of Journalism at Ryerson University between 2010-16.

 

Elaine Bernard

Dr. Elaine Bernard, Harvard University, “Trump’s War on Workers and the Environment” | Starts 40:33

Elaine is a Senior Research Associate at the Labor and Worklife Program, Harvard Law School, and previously served as its Executive Director. Elaine works with unions and labour federations around the globe, and has conducted courses on a wide variety of topics for unions, community groups, universities and government departments. Her current research and teaching interests are in the areas of international comparative labor movements and the role of unions in promoting civil society, democracy and sustainable development. Within ACW Elaine plays a pivotal role in developing the Green Workplaces training. As well, she is a member of the Manufacturing, Services and International Policy working groups, and she is a member of the steering committee.

 

Jim Chorostecki

Jim Chorostecki, British Columbia Federation of Labour, “The Softwood Lumber Dispute is the Hatfields vs. McCoys Feud Without the Guns, So Far.” | Starts 1:12:30 

Jim has been the Executive Director at B.C. Federation of Labour since 2010. In this role Jim has been responsible for initiating and overseeing a number of important projects that have been attempting to bring together various stakeholders to work together to solve the climate change crisis. Prior to this, he held positions at the Public Service Alliance of Canada, the Union of Postal Communication Employees and within the Canadian federal government. Jim is a former board member of the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives in BC and is currently an advisor on the CCPA Good Economy Project. Within the ACW grant Jim is the Co-lead for the Manufacturing working group and a member of the steering committee.

 

 

Darker Politics Panel was organized by Adapting Canadian Work and Workplaces to Respond to Climate Change, a research programme of the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada. Organisational members of ACW include York University, the Canadian Labour Congress, and 22 organisations in Canada, US, UK, EU. www.adaptingcanadianwork.ca.

 

 

ACW leads conference stream on climate change and labour

 

4-6 April 2017, Sheffield, UK

At the 35th International Labour Process Conference, held in Sheffield, UK, ACW ran a special stream titled “A Volatile Political Economy: Work, Climate Change and Labour: Labour Process Perspectives”. This was for the second year running, last year’s theme at the ILPC conference in Berlin being Labour, Work and Climate Change: a labour process perspective. The stream this year was led by Professor Carla Lipsig-Mummé of York University, Toronto, Canada and Professor Linda Clarke of the University of Westminster, UK, together with Donald Lafleur, Executive Vice-President, Canadian Labour Congress and Dr. Elaine Bernard, Director of Labor and Worklife Program, Harvard Law School, US.

The stream addressed the problematic issue that, though work, worksites and production supply chains are major polluters, the new retreat into defensive nationalism adds to the difficulties of combatting at an international level the global danger we confront. It is vital to re-connect work and political economy, so that the transition to a low carbon economy becomes an international driver for transforming the labour process to the benefit of workers. Bringing workers and unions and work itself ‘in’ to the struggle to slow global warming entails rethinking the labour process through a green lens, and adapting key steps in the chain of production to mitigate greenhouse gases. It entails reconsidering the legal, political and economic contexts that hinder or facilitate workplace low-carbon adaptation, bringing labour and environment law together, criticising work design and current business models for their carbon excesses, and rediscovering the influential roles that workers, their unions and professional associations can play in adapting and improving the labour process. And, finally, it means understanding the ways in which political economies and responses to climate change affect not only the labour process, but union goals, alliances, modes of action, organisation of young workers, political strength and strategic creativity.

Within this framework, papers were presented in four separate sessions over two days by ACW researchers, academics from universities in the UK and further afield, and those from trade union organisations.

The contributions within each themed session included:

Just Transition
• Slow Greening: Climate Literacy and the Labour Movement: Carla Lipsig-Mummé, York University, Canada
• Just Transition in a Neoliberal Context: the contradictions of labour-market policy in post-petro-state Canada: Donald Lafleur and Chris Roberts, Canadian Labour Congress
• Contesting Just Transition: a sufficient challenge to capitalist labour processes? (Ewan Kerr, University of Glasgow)

Energy Provision
• Romance or Chimaera? Industry Policy and Job Quality in European Offshore Wind Turbine Manufacturing: Lisa Shulte, Middlesex University, UK
• Decarbonising the Electricity Grid: the implications for organised labour: Colin Patrick Gleeson, University of Westminster, UK

VET for low energy construction
• Promoting Climate Literacy in British Columbia’s Apprenticeship System: evaluating one union’s efforts to overcome barriers to low carbon construction: John Calvert, Simon Fraser University, Canada
• The Role of Labour and VET in meeting Low Energy Construction Targets, Linda Clarke and Melahat Sahin-Dikmen, University of Westminster

Green Employment
• More and Better Jobs in a Low Carbon Future: provocations and possibilities: Steven Shelley, University of Hertfordshire, UK
• Gamification as Employment Strategy for Greening the Labour Process: Dean Stroud and Claire Evans, Cardiff University, UK
• The Role of Trade Unions in the Transformation towards a Low Carbon Economy: Bela Galgoczi, European Trade Union Institute, Belgium

Lively discussions followed the presentations, highlighting the significance of agency and vision in influencing the nature of the response to climate change and the critical necessity of bringing a labour perspective to bear on green transition approaches and policies by government and non-government organisations and agencies. Presentations were also informative about regional green transition initiatives involving trade unions, with discussions focusing particularly on British Columbia, Canada, the Ruhr region in Germany and Yorkshire and Humberside in the UK. Insights into the practical implementation, consequences and implications of green transitions were given in discussions about work and employment conditions in wind turbine manufacturing, training and skill needs in construction, and energy efficiency regulations in energy-intensive industries.

On the third day, the stream concluded with a panel discussion on ‘Green labour in dark times’, facilitated by responses to an imaginary scenario from 2035, when two major forces co-exist, digitalisation and climate change: can they combine or are they on a collision course? With examples of green transition initiatives from across a number of countries and regions, the possibility and need to allow for different green transitions pathways also came to the fore in the final debate. Above all, the fundamental role trade unions play in representing the interests of labour in what is a hugely complex, uneven and long transition to a green economy was reinforced.

It is intended that some of the contributions given at Sheffield and at last year’s Berlin conference will, together with contributions from ACW and other international researchers be included in two books and a special journal.

Linda Clarke, Carla Lipsig-Mummé and Melahat Sahin-Dikmen
June 2017

Climate change and work: international perspectives

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Workshop

hosted by Sheffield Climate Alliance, Sheffield Trade Union Council
and international trade unionists and researchers

Tuesday 4th April, 6.30pm to 9pm
Quaker Meeting House, 10 St James’ St, Sheffield S1 2EW

Free event with buffet supper – please book on Eventbrite by 30 Mar:
www.eventbrite.com/e/climate-change-and-work-international-perspectivestickets-32880462348

At the beginning of April, academic researchers and trade unionists from various countries
will be in Sheffield to participate in the Climate Change and Work stream of the 32nd
International Labour Process Conference at the University of Sheffield.

The Adapting Canadian Workplaces programme (www.adaptingcanadianwork.ca/), led by
Professor Carla Lipsig Mummé will be strongly represented. ACW partners include many
Canadian trade unions, including the Postal Workers, Union of Public Employees, United
Steelworkers, and British Columbian Building Trades, as well as the Labor Network for
Sustainability. The project has been building databases of collective agreement clauses and
training programmes on climate change.

We are offering the chance to meet and exchange ideas about what is being done locally in
the Sheffield area and in other parts of the globe.
International participants include:

  • Donald Lafleur, Vice President of the Canadian Labour Congress
  • Bela Galgoczi from the European Trade Union Institute
  • Carla Lipsig Mummé, of York University, Toronto
  • John Calvert, Simon Fraser University, British Columbia

 

And from the UK:

  • Graham Petersen, UCU and Greener Jobs Alliance (www.greenerjobsalliance.co.uk/)
  • Dean Stroud and Claire Evans of Cardiff University
  • Linda Clarke and Colin Gleeson, ProBE, University of Westminster
  • Martin Mayer, Sheffield TUC

 

A buffet supper and coffee/tea will be available and afterwards we will adjourn to a
local pub for drinks and a chance to chat further. Please book on Eventbrite so we
know numbers.

 

Sheffield Climate Alliance: info@sheffieldclimatealliance.net or
Linda Clarke: clarkel@wmin.ac.uk or 07821610665

Climate: a Union Issue in Canada

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by Martina Frisk

 

When unions and employers negotiate collective agreements, they speak mainly about wages and conditions. But climate change can have a place in the discussions, and even included in the contract clauses,” says Carla Lipsig-Mummé, professor of labour studies at York University, Canada.

 

Read the full article at Arbetet.ca (Swedish)

 

 

 

UNFCCC Taps ACW Project to Assist Intergovernmental Climate Change Negotiations

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Media Release
For immediate release
December 2, 2016

(Toronto, ON) A ground-breaking technical paper on jobs and climate change produced by the Secretariat of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) draws upon unique research produced by a joint labour and research project based at York University.

The UNFCCC report, entitled “Just transition of the workforce, and the creation of decent work and quality jobs,” profiles research produced by the Adapting Canadian Work and Workplaces to Respond to Climate Change project (ACW). According to the UN, the secretariat’s paper was prepared to assist nations to move decisively on reducing the greenhouse gasses produced by work and workforces, while creating decent work and quality jobs for a new labour market.

“This important UNFCCC paper breaks new ground in a much trodden field,” said Carla Lipsig-Mummé, Project Director and Principal Investigator of ACW. ‘Just transition’, carbon footprint reduction in the world of work while ensuring that good jobs and decent work are not only retained but expanded, has long been invoked. But achieving just transition has been elusive, requiring as it does a mix of state financial support and regulation, technological advances and work redesign, mobilisation of the social safety net, willingness of employers, an active labour market policy, and the creative engagement of workers and their unions.”

“The UN’s new report will deepen the international community’s understanding of the need to consider the impact of climate policies on workers, and the essential role that labour unions have in combatting climate change,” she said. “I am delighted that our research, produced through a collaboration of academic and organized labour researchers funded by the Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada, has contributed to intergovernmental climate change negotiations through the UNFCCC,” she added.

Specifically, an innovative database at York University of collective agreements clauses devoted to environmental conservation receives special recognition by the UNFCCC. “As part of the Adapting Canadian Work and Workplaces to Respond to Climate Change project, an online database of green collective agreements has been developed from UK, Australian and American as well as Canadian collective agreements. The database includes clauses related to climate change and low-carbon development,” notes the UNFCCC paper.

The UNFCCC technical paper is timely. At a recent meeting of ACW international researchers in Vancouver, concerns about “Just Transition” for workers impacted by climate change mitigation measures were high on the agenda. Participants noted with concern that governments are skirting their obligation to assist workers in the transition to a low-carbon economy.

ACW membership includes 47 individual researchers and 24 partner organizations in 4 countries and the European Union. It is a Social Sciences & Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC) Partnership Program–funded project, based at York University.

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Just transition of the workforce, and the creation of decent work and quality jobs, Bonn, Germany: United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change Secretariat, 2016. http://unfccc.int/resource/docs/2016/tp/07.pdf

 

For more information contact:
Steven Staples, ACW Communication Officer
sstaples@yorku.ca

ACW releases three new factsheets on climate and work

York University, Toronto – The Adapting Canadian Work and Workplaces to Respond to Climate Change project is pleased to announce the release of three new factsheets that examine the potential to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in workplaces across the country.

The factsheets cover the environmental challenges of vehicle manufacturing, forestry and the construction and maintenance of our built environment. They are useful to people interested in climate issues, including researchers, students, employers, and workers alike.

“These factsheets will help to educate employers and workers looking for ways to achieve the essential task of reducing the carbon footprint of the workplace,” said Carla Lipsig-Mummé, Project Director and Principal Investigator.

The factsheets are available through: http://www.adaptingcanadianwork.ca/category/factsheet/

For more information, contact:

Adapting Canadian Work and Workplaces to Respond to Climate Change
Ross North 819, 4700 Keele St.
York University, Toronto, ON, M3J 1P3
416-736-5895
acwinfo@yorku.ca

BC Green Jobs Conference: Nov 24 – 25, 2016

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The Adapting Canadian Work and Workplaces to Respond to Climate Change (ACW) project invites you to participate in the upcoming “Jobs Today, Jobs Tomorrow – BC’s Green Jobs Conference” in Vancouver, British Columbia on November 24 and 25, 2016.

Every year, the conference unites people in British Columbia around a shared plan for good, green jobs in the new economy.

Individuals and organizations from diverse professional backgrounds will convene in New Westminster’s Anvil Centre where they connect and learn through cross-sector activities and presentations.

This year’s topics include economic reconciliation, leadership for a Green Economy and advanced technology, and our Low Carbon Future.

Many Participating Researchers from ACW will be presenting at the conference, including:

  • Carla Lipsig-Mummé, Lead Researcher, Adapting Canadian Workplaces, York University
  • Elaine Bernard, Executive Director of the Labor and Worklife Program, Harvard Law School
  • John Calvert, Associate Professor, Faculty of Health Sciences SFU
  • Lee Loftus, President, British Columbia and Yukon Territory Building and Construction Trades Council

Keynote speaker Bob McDonald, host of CBC’s Quirks & Quarks, will be presenting at the conference and speaking of his latest blog post why Canada needs a green industrial revolution.

To register and purchase tickets visit http://www.greenjobsbc.org/register

For more information visit http://www.greenjobsbc.org/

ACW is proud to be a Silver Sponsor of the BC Green Jobs Conference

ACW Members Discuss Alberta Wildfire, Approve New Research Projects at Steering Committee Meeting

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The tragedy of Fort McMurray and the devastation caused by the wildfire was top-of-mind when members of the Steering Committee of the Adapting Canadian Work and Workplaces to Respond the Climate Change (ACW) project gathered at York University on May 28.

Members shared concern about the impact on the community, and sought ways that the project’s research might contribute to the rebuilding effort, especially ways that would support climate change mitigation and adaptation using low-carbon construction methods.

“Our research on the need for low-carbon buildings and well-trained construction workers could be essential to policy makers who are seeking way to rebuild Fort McMurray, while also advancing employment opportunities for displaced Albertans,” said Dr. Carla Lipsig-Mummé, Principal Investigator of the ACW project.

In addition to discussing the Alberta tragedy and receiving a briefing from Canadian Labour Congress Executive Vice-President Donald Lafleur, Steering Committee members received briefings about the International Labour Process Conference (ILPC) 2016 that took place in April where many members presented their research.

As well, members learned about the new ACW-W3 book to be published by Marjorie G. Cohen on climate, gender, policy and work in rich countries in paperback as well as hardcover, and considered new opportunities for collaboration between the ACW project and other organizations.

Several exciting events are being planned as well, including public panels in Ottawa and Toronto following the U.S. election in the Fall of 2016, and a major public event in Vancouver linking ACW’s work with the Green Jobs BC conference.

Steering Committee members also funded five new research projects that will be conducted in Canada, the U.K., the U.S., and the E.U by participating researchers and partner institutions. In addition, members endorsed the establishment of a network of Graduate Research Fellows of the ACW project.

Adapting Canadian Work and Workplaces to Respond to Climate Change: Canada in International Perspective (ACW) is a Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC) Partnership Program–funded project, based at York University.

Why work and workers matter in the environmental debate

 

ACW participating researcher Caleb Goods has recently had a short essay, titled Why work and workers matter in the environmental debate (March 19, 2016) published in the Green Agenda (Australia)

It is not hard to imagine that the world of work is a place of deep ecological impact that will be fundamentally changed by endeavours to green the economy. The implications of climate change for all workers and employers are enormous: the International Labour Organisation (ILO) suggests that 80 per cent of Europe’s CO2 emissions come from industrial production. Thus, the world of work is a critical site of ecological harm and therefore needs to be a site of deep environmentally focused transformation. The interconnection between work and climate change has lead Professor Lipsig-Mumme to conclude, ‘[g]lobal warming is likely to be the most important force transforming work and restructuring jobs in the first half of the twenty-first century’.1 The reality is all work and industries must fundamentally change, and will be changed by the climate we are creating as we enter a new geological epoch – the Anthropocene2 Climate change is challenging the future of work in highly polluting industries, such as coal, and climate change related events are already impacting workers. For example, a 2015 heat wave in India resulted in taxi unions in Kolkata urging drivers to avoid working between 11am and 4pm to reduce the risk of heat exhaustion.

The question of how work-related environmental impacts could be reduced is urgent. It is clear that all jobs and all workplaces will need to be significantly greener to preserve a liveable planet. I am not suggesting that jobs in highly polluting fossil fuel industries can be greened, greening work will require industry restructuring and transformation, but it will demand the closing down of some industries in the medium to longer term. Thus, the transition I am referring to here, the “greening” of our economy, is a societal transformation whereby economic, social and political processes are shifted away from an economic growth imperative to an ecological feasibility focus that demands work, and all that this encompasses, is both environmentally and socially defensible.

Read more

Open Your Mind: A Q&A with Carla Lipsig-Mummé

Appearing at regular intervals in YFile, “Open Your Mind” is a series of articles offering insight into the different ways York University professors, researchers and graduate students champion fresh ways of thinking in their research and teaching practices. Their approaches, grounded in a desire to seek the unexpected, are charting new courses for future generations.

Today, the spotlight is on Carla Lipsig-Mummé, the principal investigator of the seven-year SSHRC grant titled “Adapting Canadian Work and Workplaces to Respond to Climate Change: Canada in International Perspective”. She was also the principal investigator of the tri-agency research project “What do we know? What do we need to know?” and principal investigator of the CURA research program “Work in a Warming World.”

She is also a professor of work and labour studies in the Department of Social Science, Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies.

Read more

 

SSHRC awards more than $2.5 million in funding to York-led research partnerships

Carla Lipsig-Mummé, professor of work and labour studies in York’s Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies, has received more than $2.5 million over seven years through the Social Sciences & Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC) Partnership Grants program.

Lipsig-Mummé will lead a project titled “Adapting Canadian Work and Workplaces to Respond to Climate Change: Canada in International Perspective”, which investigates how best Canada’s diverse workplaces can adapt work in order to mitigate greenhouse gases. The project will also examine the changes needed in law and policy, work design and business models for industry and services, to assist the “greening” of workplaces and work. Among the goals of the project, Lipsig-Mummé and her research team hope to develop work-based strategies to reduce greenhouse gases and energy use and integrate international and national best practices into Canadian work. Training for highly qualified work-based environmental change experts is also planned.

“It goes without saying that slowing global warming is a huge issue,” says Lipsig-Mummé. “The world of work has been neglected terrain in responding to climate change, but the structures of work, of modern business organizations, and of unions make it easier, not harder, to adapt work in order to mitigate greenhouse gases. After all, work creates the majority of GHGs produced by human activity in developed countries like Canada.”

The national project, which will also receive more than $2.2 million in matching funding and contributions from partnering organizations, includes 38 individual members and 19 partners in four countries. The team’s partners are labour unions and business organizations, government and public sector organizations, think tanks, universities and environmental groups. Team expertise spans natural and applied sciences, engineering, management, law, environmental studies, social sciences and organizational leadership.

“We are delighted by the results of the recent SSHRC competitions, reflecting York’s leadership in large-scale collaborative research projects,” said Robert Haché, York’s vice-president research and innovation. “Professor Lipsig-Mummé is conducting important research with partners in government, academia and public sector organizations to help workplaces in Canada address important issues of climate change and develop work-based strategies to reduce greenhouse gases and energy use.

Two York researchers also received $313,396 in funding under the Partnership Development Grants Program, which provides support to foster new research and related activities with new or existing partners; and to design and test new partnership approaches for research and/or related activities.

“York University is committed to supporting the growth and development of initiatives to enable the recognition of the University as a Canadian leader in sustainability research,” added Haché.

The announcement was made earlier today by the Honourable Minister of State (Science and Technology) Ed Holder. In total, $44 million is being awarded to support funding for 57 new Partnership Development Grants and 14 Partnership Grants.

For a complete list of Partnership Grant and Partnership Development Grant awards, visit the SSHRC website.

Arielle Zomer, Research Communications, York University, 416-736-2100 ext. 21069, azomer@yorku.ca